Painted Cabinets: 3 Things to Know

Painted cabinets are popular and also require a commitment from the homeowner to keep them in pristine condition, typically more maintenance than stained cabinetry. If you plan to select painted cabinetry for your home, here are three things to know about paint on wood surfaces.

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Paint characteristics are the same, no matter the brand, the surface, or the cabinet manufacturer. What can you expect when you buy painted cabinets from Showplace?

As described in our blog about stains, wood allows stains to soak into wood and take on some of the character of the wood.

Paint, on the other hand, just sits on top of surfaces, including wood used for cabinets. We go to great lengths to ensure your cabinets look like new for as long as possible, but here are 3 things to expect from painted cabinets.

Cracked paint from separated door joint

Open Door Joints

When we build our doors, we use glue and joint grooves to construct the doors. Then, we place all doors in a clamp that presses the joints together until the glue dries. This process ensures that the door construction is as solid as possible.

Change in climate, meaning high or low humidity, may cause wood to shrink or expand, causing paint to crack at those joints where there may be the most movement. This is normal and is not considered a warranty event.

Chipped paint on cabinet door

Surface Damage

Even though we move all finished parts through a large oven to bake on a top coat for all finishes, that is no match for life with kids and pets.

Toys, claws, pots and pans, utensils, and other hard, sharp surfaces can still do damage to our paint and this is not covered under our warranty.

Surface damage includes stain spots, chips, paint wear, scratches, and more.

Image of Water Damage on cabinet drawer front

Water Damage

Just like with the wear and tear from living around your cabinets, water and other liquids can also damage painted surfaces.

You may see abnormal wear to your paint on cabinets around a sink or waste basket cabinet.

Be sure to take care of your cabinets using the information in our blog post about caring for painted cabinets.

It’s important to note that touch up kits for our standard paints are an easy tool to help with maintenance on chips and blemishes. Be sure to ask your dealer to include a kit with your painted order.

Wood Grain and Stain: 3 Things to Know

If you plan to select stained cabinetry for your home, here are three things to know about how wood grain can affect the look of your stained cabinetry.

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No matter where you purchase your cabinets, you will most likely select a wood species that is universal among all manufacturers, so the results will be very similar.

Stains respond differently to the species of wood you choose. Each type of wood has a different level of density and grain characteristic that determines how the stain will soak in and appear. The pattern of graining is unique to each wood species.

Of course, light also affects the look of any finish. See our blog post on the effects of light on cabinet color.

Let’s take a look at some cabinets in our factory to see how the look of stain changes with different graining.

Grain Pattern

As you can see, this vanity cabinet has doors and slab drawer headers with varying grain patterns which change the look of our Thunder stain on red oak.

The slab drawer headers and door frames are made of solid wood. The customer opted to choose doors with veneered plywood center panels instead of solid wood panels. The grain is horizontal on the headers, causing the stain to appear darker than the doors that have vertical graining.

The door center panels are made of veneered plywood, which also have varying grain characteristics.

This look is acceptable and shows the uniqueness of stained woods.

Quartersawn White Oak Cashew drawer base cabinet

Cut Direction

The drawer headers on this three-drawer base cabinet are made of quartersawn white oak finished with our Cashew stain. We also used our Weathering process with Walnut accents to create a worn look.

Notice the cut pattern causes the stain to soak in differently, creating a beautiful look with the variety of graining.

The varying levels of light and darkness in the finish of this Character Stain show the true beauty of this wood and cut.

This look is also acceptable and typical of this type of wood.

Row of natural walnut cabinets

Heart or Sap Wood

Of course, even natural wood has a variety of looks without a stain to highlight those variances.

Grain varies, causing the look to be different on each piece used to build a cabinet, but so does the presence of sap or heart wood.

This pair of natural walnut cabinets highlights how wood color varies when light areas of sap wood are present.

This look is acceptable and shows the true character of woods like walnut.

What Color is It?

Do you want to match the paint of your Showplace cabinets for your walls? Or do you have a special wood piece that you want to match your stained Showplace cabinets? Read on to learn what you can and can’t do.

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No matter where you purchase your cabinets, you will most likely select a wood species that is universal among all manufacturers, so the results will be very similar.

You can purchase our paints and stains through a local Showplace dealer. But, if you want to purchase one of our standard colors to paint your wall or finish a your own trim or a special furniture piece, you may want to look to your local Sherwin-Williams store. 

Our stains are proprietary formulas for Showplace, but you can purchase our stains through your dealer, or take a finished sample to your local paint store to match the stain color.

Many of our paints are from Sherwin-Williams’ standard paint collection, but a few are formulated specifically for Showplace.

Grain Pattern

As you can see, this vanity cabinet has doors and slab drawer headers with varying grain patterns which change the look of our Thunder stain on red oak.

The slab drawer headers and door frames are made of solid wood. The customer opted to choose doors with veneered plywood center panels instead of solid wood panels. The grain is horizontal on the headers, causing the stain to appear darker than the doors that have vertical graining.

The door center panels are made of veneered plywood, which also have varying grain characteristics.

This look is acceptable and shows the uniqueness of stained woods.

Quartersawn White Oak Cashew drawer base cabinet

Cut Direction

The drawer headers on this three-drawer base cabinet are made of quartersawn white oak finished with our Cashew stain. We also used our Weathering process with Walnut accents to create a worn look.

Notice the cut pattern causes the stain to soak in differently, creating a beautiful look with the variety of graining.

The varying levels of light and darkness in the finish of this Character Stain show the true beauty of this wood and cut.

This look is also acceptable and typical of this type of wood.

Row of natural walnut cabinets

Heart or Sap Wood

Of course, even natural wood has a variety of looks without a stain to highlight those variances.

Grain varies, causing the look to be different on each piece used to build a cabinet, but so does the presence of sap or heart wood.

This pair of natural walnut cabinets highlights how wood color varies when light areas of sap wood are present.

This look is acceptable and shows the true character of woods like walnut.